The forms of knowledge dissemination

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The dissemination of knowledge can take different forms: launching institutions (the SEMC, the Special Education Methodological Centres) designed for diffusing knowledge and good practices, or fighting bad practices and promoting good practices at the same time (quality assurance through "equality experts" in charge of the LPEEOP); extending state-initiated training programs (targeting both special educators and "regular teachers"), introducing new tests and protocols, as well as new textbooks and teaching materials, etc. Because policy per definitionem often fails to teach implementers what they need to know to do policy.

Instead, it identifies a network of nonstate policy professionals "professional associations, academics, trainers, and consultants who disseminate policy and its entailments to implementers, acting as nonstate resources for getting policy done" (Hill, 2003).

Knowledge diffusion is far from being a top-down process. The emergence of "non-knowledge" and "specified ignorance" (see: comparison zone Nr 10) on the national level leads to the search for local evidence and personal experience. The public action wouldn‘t have been initiated without the visits of leading special education scholars in malfunctioning special schools, and those ministerial decision-makers who had self-experienced segregation, or pursued successful innovative strategies on de-segregation/inclusion on the local level.

Knowledge diffusion is far from being a top-down process. The emergence of "non-knowledge" and "specified ignorance" on the national level leads to the search for local evidence and personal experience. The public action wouldn‘t have been initiated without the visits of leading special education scholars in malfunctioning special schools, and those ministerial decision-makers who had self-experienced segregation, or pursued successful innovative strategies on de-segregation/inclusion on the local level.

ERÖSS Gábor & KENDE Anna (2009), All against misdiagnosis - Sociologists, neurologists, economists, psychologists and special educators for inclusion, KNOWandPOL report, 3-4.

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  • HILL Heather C. (2003), Understanding Implementation: Street-Level Bureaucrats’ Resources for Reform, Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, 13, 265-282.

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